How to season a cast iron teapot

18.06.2021 By Taumi

how to season a cast iron teapot

Cast Iron Teapot Care Instructions

May 02,  · I bought an antique cast iron tea kettle and turns out it has several pounds of rust caked on it. We are going to remove years of abuse and get this cast iro. Technically you don’t season enameled cast iron because there’s nothing it can really absorb, but it will acquire a patina over a long period of time. Always rinse it out after using it and make sure all parts are dry before putting the lid back on so it doesn’t rust. WM stuff is really bad about having the full instructions on the item itself.

Cutest little squatty blue thing decorated with leaping koi. Would much appreciate any input from the experts here on Steepster as to cleaning, storing, seasoning, etc.

My understanding is that how to increase your vertical leap in 2 weeks are traditionally used as hot water fast, but work fine for brewing as tapot. Do you think rinsing seasonn with boiling water will be enough to disinfect it before putting it in regular use?

Thanks muchly for your help. Thank you; I stand corrected — a tetsubin is a non-enamelled iron water kettle. Sigh… so much to drink; so much to learn! Login or sign up to post a message. Before using, fill with warm water. After using, rinse with warm water. If the pot is still hot from the tea, that makes it dry a lot easier with less risk of damaging the enamel.

Well, how to find usb 3.0 port in my computer your heart! I thought the inside tea;ot a bit weird, but never thought of a hoe enamel. After reading your post I looked the teapot up on the World Market site and found that they are indeed enamelled. I was kinda hopeful about the genie thing, though. WM stuff is really bad about having the full instructions on the item itself.

I forget what I bought that I found more about by looking it up online. Kind of silly. Login or sign up to leave a comment. Teas Places Discussions Explore. Learn More Sign Up Log in. Seasoning a Cast Iron Teapot Hi. Delete Topic Edit Topic. The colored ones are so seadon :. I'm definitely not an expert, but I'm pretty sure the only care hw cast iron pot needs oron an occasional rinse with water, and make sure NOT to use soap on it!

Reply Edit. Yes, it has a mesh infuser -- small, but I don't think I could get anything much larger in the little guy. Thank you; I stand corrected -- a tetsubin is a non-enamelled iron water kettle. Even edited my original post so I ho pretend I'm not quite so knowledge-challenged. The teapots from World Market are matte enameled I believe at least the one's I've purchased are. Gently dry it pat it with a soft cloth, don't rub it no genie will come out. If it's not finished, then I'm not sure what to do.

The care instructions that come with the pot simply say "Hand wash"; they need a decent copywriter. Many thanks; you've saved me a LOT of work! Technically you don't season enameled cast iron because there's nothing it can really absorb, but it will acquire a patina over a long period of time. Always rinse it out after using it and make sure all parts are dry before putting the lid back on so it doesn't rust.

How to use a cast-iron teapot for the first time?

Jan 23,  · How To Properly Season Your Cast Iron Kettle With the Curing Process There are different types of cast iron kettles on the market. One type being of cast iron construction and having a porcelain enamel finish which will not need to be cured because it already has a coating to prevent the kettle or steamer from rusting. The tannic acid in tea leaves will react with red iron rust on the kettle to produce a more stable, blue-black compound called ferric tannate. To "season" a brand new tea kettle you can save used tea leaves and bags then place several in the pot and adding boiling water. Allow the "tea" to sit for 20 minutes then discard and rinse. Mar 15,  · Invert the pot to air dry before replacing infuser and lid. Avoid contact with salt and oils. Due to the iron content of the teapot, we recommend the use of a trivet to protect table linens and surfaces. In the unlikely event of rust, the pot can still be used. .

To assure the longevity of your cast iron teapot or tetsubin non kettle type please follow these basic guidelines: Before using your cast iron teapot for the first time: Thoroughly rinse the teapot with hot water.

While the teapot is still warm, dry the teapot inside and out with a dry cloth. When using your teapot always note the following: Use the cast iron teapot to brew tea, not as a stove-top kettle. The enamel lining is fragile and could be damaged.

Never use in a microwave oven. Do not scrub the teapot with abrasive pads or use any detergents, simply rinse it with water ONLY and wipe it dry after each use. Do not leave any tea or water in the teapot for long periods of time.

Always wipe the outside with a dry cloth while the teapot is still warm. Do not expose the teapot to salt or oil. Never use a dishwasher to clean it. Never suddenly cool the teapot when it is still warm. The inside of the teapot is glazed, so choose kitchen utensils that do not scratch the glaze; by doing so you will be assured years of enjoyment from your teapot.

You can boil tea in the teapot a few times to help get rid of the new interior coating odor. Remove the teapot lid while the teapot is drying.

You may notice red spots on the bottom of the teapot after about two to three weeks after first use. This is normal and is no cause for alarm. You may also see white water marks and this too is also normal and is not unusual as they will help to prevent rust. In Japan, a natural mineral layer buildup from use is considered to be good for the health and to help prevent rust from forming.

Please do not wash or rub the teapot inside or outside with a sponge, detergent, brush or cleaning implement.

Do not leave water inside for long periods of time after use. You may polish the surface of the teapot with a lightly squeezed soft cloth, which has been soaked with tea as this will help to keep it looking glossy.

Indentations on the bottom of the teapot are normal and are formed during the process of making the teapot.